A Brick in the Wall

I am writing this post with my feet up and an ice pack around my left ankle. No, I haven’t suffered a dramatic injury. It’s more a matter of running into a wall I’ve seen ahead of me but haven’t had to acknowledge before now: age.

Not old age, yet. Just age. My ankle is on ice because I had my weekly ballet class last night. For several weeks, we’ve been working on a complicated section of petits battements, small jumps and footwork. These movements require speed, strength and elasticity. Until recently, I was pretty decent at them. Now, repeated practice has resulted in swelling and tenderness along both Achilles tendons, to the point that I am in pain not only when I dance, but when I do other things. Like walk down steps.

I’ve danced most of my life and know what to do to minimize injuries.  I’ve also tried to dance through the pain, but it has worsened progressively. Despite my attempts to avoid a doctor’s appointment until June, I’ll go in sometime in the next two weeks. Online research about my symptoms keep bringing up articles about tendonitis, and they all have variations of the phrase “often afflicts people over 40”.  Well, I am over 40 all right. Way over 40. Over ten years over 40, in fact.

As walls go, this one is more an annoyance than a serious, stop-you-cold-in-your tracks issue like catastrophic illness or losing your retirement savings. But it IS an annoyance. I may have to cut back on an activity I love because my body can’t do it any more.

That weekly dance class is a huge stress reliever. No matter how rotten my mood is when I go in, I am calmer and happier when I leave. I don’t pretend to understand how movement and exertion affect human brain chemistry. What I do understand is that the stylized posture and movements of ballet require my complete attention.  I can’t pirouette and let my mind wander to the car repair bill or the chapter that is not working. If my attention wanders from the steps I’m doing, I lose balance or fall behind.

There’s also the pleasure of mastering a new skill, or at least improving it. And I’m not going to lie — it’s an ego boost to know I can keep up with girls my daughter’s age. At least I could before now. Grumble.

If I can put my poor baby self-image aside, there are solutions to my aching ankles. First, I need to get to the doctor and get her diagnosis. Second, I will discuss my dilemma with the dance studio director and ask for her recommendation. I once joked in class that I’d continue ballet until I had to hobble to the barre with a walker. While it seems less amusing today, I do know that adjustments are possible.

But nobody says I have to like them.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “A Brick in the Wall”

    1. Awww, thanks Penney! I’m following basic protocols until my doctor’s appointment, and will go from there. Luckily, I don’t think I’ll need any prescription painkillers, which turn my brain to mush. (It works slowly enough as it is, lol!)

      Like

  1. I am so sorry about your ankle.And yes I know what age can do to you,as I am a little elder than you.Pert near 60,but who is counting.It is rather depressing to say the least to not be able to do the things we could do,or not do them as well.Good luck with your ankle and your dance,I do hope the recommendations will be to your liking.

    Like

    1. It is frustrating, but my hope is that I can move to a less advanced class. Age lends perspective and hopefully wisdom, but it’s toll on the body isn’t fun, is it? Thank you so much for the good wishes! They are very much appreciated.

      Like

    1. Thank you, Emily. After a couple days of ice packs, taking it easy and Aleve, I am almost walking normally, lol!

      Seriously it feels much better today, although I still need to have the doctor take a look them.

      Like

  2. I think it’s so cool that you dance! I used to tap dance–but I haven’t done much in ages. I hope your ankle heals soon so you can grand jete back into class 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s